What is a Radio Wave?

Radio waves are electromagnetic waves with a frequency of about 3 kHz to 300 GHz. Microwaves are a subset of the radio waves with frequencies ranging between 300 MHz and 3 GHz. Radio waves are generated by the movement of electric charges on the antenna, and referred to as radio frequency (RF) radiation, for irradiating the area away from the source, i.e. the transmitting antenna. The airwaves belong to the category of non-ionizing radiation as it is unable to break chemical bonds or to extract electrons from atoms, causing ionization of matter such as radiation (X-rays, gamma rays). In contrast to ionization, which is dangerous because it can lead to deterioration of the genetic material and cause harmful effects on health (such as cancer), the main biological effect of radio waves under certain circumstances is the increase of tissue temperature exposed to them. To date studies have not documented a

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The measurement of stellar parallax by Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel

Stellar Parallax The man’s attempt to determine the distance of stars from Earth has a long history. The Greek astronomer Aristarchus of Samos (320 BC-250 BC) and the Polish astronomer Copernicus knew that if the Earth revolved around the Sun, one would expect the stars to shift back and forth every year. The theory of Aristarchus almost completed the Kepler (16os- 17th c. AD), mystic and mathematician, proposed the elliptical orbits of the planets, argued that the Sun, “the center of the temple of God”, ensures the movement of the planets and formulated the laws of motion of celestial bodies, which Newton completed the “law of universal gravitation.” The Aristarchos work ranks among the brightest minds in Greek and ancient world. The findings have enormous scientific value and leave astonished astronomers today, as no one can be sure how it was made. Unfortunately, Aristarchus and Copernicus never managed to observe

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